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Floreen proposes major changes to collective bargaining in Montgomery County

Montgomery County Council President Nancy Floreen, who led the effort this spring to trim previously negotiated pay raises from public employee union contracts, is proposing legislation to bring what she calls more “balance” to the county’s collective bargaining process.Floreen’s bill, to be introduced at Tuesday’s legislative session, would open parts of the negotiations between unions and the county government to the public for the first time and use retired judges, rather than experienced labor negotiators, as neutral third parties. It would replace the single arbitrator who currently decides labor disputes with a three-person panel, and require that panel to give more weight to the county’s financial ability to pay for labor agreements.“This Council is committed to finding the right balance between the needs of our residents and the needs of our employees,” Floreen (D-At Large), considered one of the more business-friendly members of the all-Democratic council, said in a statement Monday. “The bill would help the County and our employees establish more equitable contract arbitration awards and enhance the likelihood that negotiations are grounded in fiscal reality.”

Smaller pay raises, class sizes could be coming to Montgomery Co.

WASHINGTON — Thousands of Montgomery County employees who were expecting a raise will get less than they bargained for, and parents may see smaller class sizes in their children’s classrooms.

That’s because the Montgomery County Council — in a preliminary vote — approved a plan to reduce the compensation packages for unions that represent teachers, firefighters, police officers and service workers.

Montgomery Council calls for reduction in wage in negotiated wage hikes

The Montgomery County Council rejected a proposed $100 million package of pay hikes averaging about 8 percent for teachers and other unionized employees Tuesday, telling County Executive Isiah Leggett and the Board of Education that the increases need to be pared back.The raises were negotiated by the county and school system as part of collective bargaining agreements. But council members, who are also considering a 6.4 percent property tax increase to fund the 2017 budget that goes into effect July 1, said the hikes are out of scale in an economy where inflation is low and Social Security beneficiaries won’t see an annual cost-of-living adjustment.

Phased-in 17.5% raise approved for Montgomery County Council

From the Washington Post By Bill Turque October 22, 2013 The Montgomery County Council on Tuesday approved a proposed 17.5 percent pay hike for members taking office after the 2014 elections, but to deflect constituent criticism eight months before the primary...

ABOUT MONTGOMERY COUNTY’S BUDGET PROBLEM

Montgomery County will spend $4.3 billion this year to fund the priorities established by the County Executive in consultation with the County Council. Public safety—police, fire and rescue service—and libraries were among the essential services that were subjected to...

Another Outrage

Montgomery County doesn’t have enough money to honor its contracts to police officers, firefighters and general government workers, so how can they “forgive” $450,000 in taxes that Lockheed Martin owes? The County Council will hold a hearing on Sept. 21 to review a...

Money for Rocking, But Not for Reading?

Montgomery County is ready to move mountains to get County Executive Ike Leggett’s pet Fillmore Project built, but not for libraries. It has recently come to light that the County “found” some $3 million in additional funds for Fillmore—even though the...

Valerie Ervin Attacking Public Employees

Montgomery’s $18 million schools ‘miracle’

By Editorial, Published: June 11 WHEN THE Montgomery County Council scratched $25 million from spending on county schools last month — cuts that amounted to scarcely 1 percent of the schools’ budget — howls of protest were heard. The Board of Education cried foul, and...

Unshackling Montgomery County Police

Editorial, Published: July 13 WHEN WAS IT that the management of the Montgomery County Police Department began to resemble a California commune, circa the Summer of Love? If forced to pinpoint a date, we might say it was April 6, 1982. That’s when the County Council...

New bill would help contain runaway spending in Montgomery County

Thursday, December 9, 2010; 9:22 PM PUBLIC WORKERS in Montgomery County have enjoyed a spectacular run over the last decade, thanks to munificent politicians, powerful unions and a badly tilted playing field that favors workers over management. Many workers who were...

Common sense, at last, on the Montgomery County budget

By Editorial, Published: May 10 A JUDGE IN Montgomery County has ruled that the county executive owes primary responsibility in drafting his annual budget to — surprise! — his constituents. That conclusion, reached by circuit court judge Ronald B. Rubin last week, may...

Driving up labor costs in Montgomery County

By Editorial, Published: May 2 | Updated: Tuesday, April 26, 4:14 PM THROUGH A 25-YEAR political career that has included leadership roles in Montgomery County and a stint as Maryland’s Democratic Party chairman, Isiah Leggett, the current county executive, has been a...

Level the field on contracts

Saturday, March 5, 2011; 6:35 PM MONTGOMERY COUNTY has dug itself a budgetary hole so deep that it will take major structural and systemic reforms for it to climb out. Even after severe spending cuts for the past several years, the county still has to slash $300...

Question A Support

One Volunteer’s Thoughts on Ambulance Billing

One Volunteer’s Thoughts on Ambulance Billing By Geoffrey Burns So, the great debate in Montgomery County fire houses, the internet, and just about everywhere else you look is the debate over the implementation of an EMS Transport Fee. Let’s look at the pros of this...

As the ambulance rolls, insurance pays the tolls

As the ambulance rolls, insurance pays the tolls

Silver Chips Online Ambulance reimbursement fees are a wise way to raise revenue for emergency response By Maureen Lei, Page Editor October 7, 2010 When a fuse box explodes and sets a home on fire, a senior citizen has a stroke or an office building collapses, a hero...